Amber Best Practices
  • Updated on 22 Nov 2019
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Amber Best Practices

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DOs

Pre - Launch:

1. Generate the right buzz around Amber's launch: A structured communication plan including well-timed email campaigns, posters, and so on, will help drive adoption rates. You can check out a few examples and approaches for introducing Amber in our Launch Communication section.

2. Ensure emails go from CEO: To ensure maximum impact, the CEO should be the primary admin for all reachout emails to employees. This creates a sense of importance and value for the employee to open and act on the email shared.

3. Restrict access to maintain strict confidentiality: It is recommended that only the CEO and/or core HR leaders have access to Amber’s dashboard/reports.

4. Select a champion for each department unit: We have learned from our customers that an influencer/champion has been highly effective in encouraging participation and engagement with Amber.

5. Differentiate between Amber and Anonymous Bat: It is critical to define and differentiate both to employees right at the start. We recommend sharing Amber’s Trust Statement and clearly defining confidentiality along with Anonymous Bat’s definition of anonymity (nudging employees to speak to Amber first).

Post - Launch:

1. Ensure at-risk employees are met with: Human interactions with at-risk employees will have a positive impact on your culture if this is done within 30 days. After 1:1 meetings, the HRBP can document notes and mark cases as “closed” on Amber’s dashboard. Based on what we have learnt from customers, around 88% employees highlighted at risk by Amber have been retained by the organisation because of timely interactions and interventions.

2. Give equal importance to fence sitters: High potential new hires or critical senior employees whose mood has been recorded as neutral by Amber should also to be met 1:1 Such sessions can help you uncover sensitive issues that may be detrimental to your organization's culture.

3. Conduct “informal” 1:1s with at-risk (PTM) employees to increase employee comfort: Instead of directly referring to an employee’s answers in Amber’s chat, discussing those topics in an informal manner can help employees open up as compared to formal 1:1s.

4. Track action taken on employee feedback: You can track whether action has been taken or not on employee feedback with the help of the Open/Closed option in PTM. It is recommended to follow-up with the employee to see if their issue/concern has been resolved. The ‘Notes’ feature helps in keeping a log of these issues as well as backtracking.

5. Always reply to anonymous messages: Ensure that you are addressing issues/concerns over anonymous messages on a weekly basis. This helps build trust with employees and assures them that they are being heard and valued.

6. Track Driver-Elements on a month-on-month basis: This will help you keep an eye on key areas that need attention.

7. Conduct periodic checkpoints for action planning: In fortnightly or monthly HR leadership meets, narrow down 3 department-level action points and 3 most critical at-risk individuals to be reviewed based on Amber reports.

8. Ensure your team is aware about actions taken for those in PTM: Adding notes for employees highlighted under People to Meet is highly recommended to keep your team, especially new members, aware of the actions being taken on their responses. In case the employee's concerns are resolved, mark the status of that conversation as Closed or else keep it In Progress. For serious cases that need escalation, use the Notify option with your note to loop in the Super Admins.

DON'Ts

Pre - Launch:

1. Avoid over pitching: While generating the right buzz around Amber, it is important to not over communicate which results in cognitive overload for employees. This may result in employees either not processing the required information or deterring from talking to Amber when she does reach out post the launch.

2. Avoid anonymity when sharing feedback: Ensure employees are encouraged to openly share their feedback with Amber. Make it amply clear that faster actions can be taken if they can trust and confide in her. Establish that Anonymous Bat is there only when the concerns require absolute discretion.

Post - Launch:

1. Avoid reprimanding employees for negative feedback: Scolding employees for writing negative feedback will backfire and lead to a dip in terms of honesty in conversations. Instead, employees should be encouraged for raising negative issues constructively.

2. Avoid forwarding Amber emails/reports to managers: Sharing reports that have names with direct/reporting managers can feel like a breach of trust for the employees. HRBPs should ideally remove the names and share reports with the concerned managers to help them develop the right action plans.

3. Avoid taking feedback personally​: The leadership team must be informed that the feedback is not personally targetted at them. Establish that constructive criticism must and should be welcomed with open arms.

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